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Posts Tagged ‘ecological footprint’

My article on ‘The Failure of the Green Media to Communicate Simply‘ generated a very rich discussion amongst readers. All agreed on the importance of not overwhelming people with extensive green to-do lists, and the need to direct the focus instead, on the top household contributors to greenhouse gases emissions. This is where numbers come in. I searched and found this chart from the Energy Information Facts Agency at the Department of Energy, the best in my opinion, in terms of its ability to showcase actionable data.

Top Three Green Actions to Reduce your Ecological Footprint

Another way to massage those numbers is to aggregate car and home contributions and rank the resulting contributions, in terms of percentage of direct household emissions:

  1. car 49%
  2. space heating 24%
  3. lighting and appliances 12%

What does this mean in terms on individual green actions and priorities? The Union of Concerned Scientists recommends the following:

  1. drive less and drive more fuel-efficient and less polluting cars; carpool, take mass transit, walk, or bike whenever possible
  2. use Energy Star appliances, replace your old light bulbs with CFLs (compact fluorescent lights), and ask each household member to be responsible for turning off different appliances, lights.
  3. contact your city for home energy audit; insulate your home, and install programmable thermostat, set temperatures to recommended levels.

Still a lot to chew on, for most people, myself included. But a useful framework for green communication strategies and behavioral interventions at the household level. Next, I will try to address my friend Anne’s request of ‘Tell me the one green thing I should do‘.

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Day 17 of Daily Footprint Project. The memory of last week’s toxic attack, motivated me to take action before Esperanza’s visit today. Esperanza is our cleaning lady. I have been talking for a long time, about greening our household cleaning products. Talking, writing about, but no action. Last week, the air in the house after Esperanza came, got the best of my lungs. I had to open all the windows, to let in the fresh air, and give my burning throat and lungs a rest. For months now, I have been suffering from a chronic cough, and asthma like symptoms. Same with Catherine. Both she and I have been to several doctors, and tried inhalers and various medicines, with no results. Finally, I got motivated into action. Prad dismissed my concerns, and tried to dissuade me. ‘All these people using those products, and nobody has gotten sick. You are overreacting.‘ I did not listen to him. I was on a mission.

First, let me say this, it is not easy getting a straight answer on cleaning products. I had to go through quite a few dead venues, before I found the information I was looking for. First, I started with TreeHugger. Then made my way to the Household Products Database. Very thorough and scientific, but it failed to give me the straight answers I was looking for. How bad were the commercial products I was currently using? Which brands would they recommend as perfectly safe? Along the way, I came across several places advocating making my own cleaning products. I finally landed on an article from Organic Consumers that gave me the answers I was looking for.

Now I am a poster girl for Seventh Generation. I purchased the whole line at Whole Foods. Laundry detergent, dishwashing soap, dishwasher detergent, glass cleaner, all purpose cleaner, toilet bowl cleaner, shower cleaner, and kitchen cleaner. For furniture, I got the Earth Friendly Furniture Polish. But there are quite a few other brands out there that would do just as good of a job.

When Cleaning House Turns Toxic

Above is a picture of all the stuff I had to get rid off. In good conscience, I could not throw it into the garbage. For now, it has been relegated to our garage, waiting for our next trip to the recycling center.

Esperanza left. And I am enjoying not smelling anything, for a change.

The household cleaning products industry is huge. I am imagining all the women, the children, the houses that keep being intoxicated, over and over again, by these everyday products. Lulled into the false reassurance of advertisements touting the benefit of a clean smelling house. What is clean smelling anyway?

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #17

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 5
shower 1
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:
run full load dishwasher

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
microwave soup 2’
microwave leftover pasta
microwave milk 2’
laptop on all day
mom:
heat cream of wheat
broil steak
communal:
lights
cook bokchoy in wok
boil water for pasta
fry pasta in wok

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic apple sauce
tea
organic milk
takeout bean soup from Whole Foods
organic chocolate
raspberries
leftover pasta
mom:
cream of wheat with organic milk
organic grapes
communal:
stir fried bokchoy
organic pasta with Italian prosciutto and fresh mozarella

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
raspberries plastic box
mom:
most of cream of wheat (leftover from breakfast)
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers
two hardened half bread loaves
old household cleaning products (to wait for city collection of toxic products)
soup carton

Recycling

personal:
three sheets of paper
mom:
communal:
2 papers
milk carton

Transportation

personal:
mom:
communal:
drive to Whole Foods 5 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:
Seventh Generation cleaning products

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Day 15 of Daily Footprint Project. The day for round two of gum surgery. Oh, joy! I am to eat only soft food for the next few days. Fortunately, there is Whole Foods and its well stocked deli section.

Why should I cook if I don’t have to?

The split pea soup with ham struck my fancy. I filled up the biggest size carton. Prad did the calculation. Per ounce, it is really the best deal.

As of late, I am relying more and more on Whole Foods and other outside cookeries to supplement our menus. With the children less and less home for our family dinners, cooking has lost some of its appeal. In fact, it has become a chore, that detracts from other creative activities I’ d much rather be doing. Blogging, exploring ideas for green ventures are where my heart is for now.

I may be happy away from the kitchen, but what does that do for the environment? The image of the throw away soup carton is haunting me. With each take out, I add to the landfill pile. I could go around the problem, by bringing my own containers. I have never seen anyone do it, but maybe I could start a trend. Actually, it would be kind of cool to see what people say. The more I think about it, I totally dig the idea.

Until I get a bike – number one on my green to do list – , there is also the issue of driving to get the soup. I can rationalize by thinking that I would need to drive anyway to buy the ingredients to make the soup. The answer to that one is twofold: one, get a bike, two, plan better and make less trips to the grocery store. Even more ambitious, would be to also cultivate my own vegetables. I am learning to be practical, however, and to consider only what I know myself capable of sustaining in the long run. Gardening is just not my thing. Better scrap that idea.

There is a third problem with relying on take out. Food sourcing. I give up any control on the types of ingredients that are being used. Same when I eat out at a restaurant. In both cases, I am abdicating my responsibility as a responsible consumer, leaving it to others to decide what goes into my food. Once you start, this kind of logic can be crazy making, and realistically, I am not going to give up eating out. Still, there is some truth in the thought, and maybe reason for a compromise. Like air traveling, the idea is not to give up such indulgences altogether. More sensible, is to limit them to special occasions, and make them the exceptions rather than the norm.

I can think of one good argument for not cooking in my kitchen. Foodpooling, as in carpooling. I just made up the word. It is much more efficient to cook for hundreds of people at once, as is the case for Whole Foods, than to each cook our separate meals. I am not aware of any study on the topic, but I am ready to bet that the energy saved must be substantial.

To summarize, if I manage to bike to the grocery store, and bring my own containers, I will come out pretty clean here.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #15

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
shower 1
full load laundry
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:
run full dishwasher

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
microwave soup 4’
microwave milk 2’
laptop on half day
full load laundry washer & dryer
mom:
communal:
lights
run full dishwasher

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmons
tea
organic milk
takeout split pea soup from Whole Foods
organic apple sauce
organic chocolate
mom:
organic apples
communal:

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers
five day leftover chicken soup

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
milk carton
glass jar apple sauce

Transportation

personal:
drive to orthodontist 5 miles
mom:
communal:

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

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Day 14 of Daily Footprint Project. I was in a hurry, and needed to get some more apples for our fruit basket.

What Happened to the Apples?

I could have gone to the farmers’ market earlier, but did not get a chance. There is this local apple grower who sells all kinds of unusual apples, each week. Too much to do. How come I am always rushing? Instead, I went to Whole Foods, and circled the produce section, in search of the perfect apple. I counted nine kinds of apples. Jonagold. Granny Smith. Honeycrisp. Gala. Braeburn. Pink Lady. Golden Delicious. Red Delicious. Fuji. I knew all of them, and none enthused me. Today, I wanted a real apple, like the ones from my childhood, all weird looking with spots on them, bugs inside sometimes even, not too crunchy, not too soft, and a full bodied sweetness I can’t bear to remember, so good it was. I seriously considered going home without my apples? Again I went around, trying to decide which ones I could settle for. Out of desperation, I picked some boring Golden Delicious, still too green in my opinion. At least, the kids would have apples to munch on.

This week, I have had the privilege to meet with two conservation specialists. Both told me similar stories, about the loss of diversity for some of our most common fruit and vegetables. Apples are at the forefront of a biodiversity war apparently, and a race to keep alive the thousands of varieties still existing. In the introduction to his 2005 report, Kanin Routson, from Northern Arizona University, provides a useful perspective on the magnitude of the problem:

‘The industrialization of agriculture has replaced the subsistence farms and their associated diversity with huge monocultural fields planted in a handful of high yielding crop varieties. Horticultural crops are no exception. In his book, ‘The Nomenclature of the Apple’, W. H. Ragan lists over 14,000 named apple varieties referenced in US literature between 1804 and 1904. Today the apple has been reduced to around 90 commercial varieties, with a handful of varieties, namely Granny Smith, Red Delicious, Gala and Fuji making up about 90% of commercial apple production. In the modern version of Ragan’s work, ‘The Fruit Berry and Nut Inventory’, Kent Whealy lists about 1500 apple varieties that are currently available through US nurseries, many of which have been developed through modern fruit breeding. That suggests as much as a 93% loss in apple variety availability in the U. S. over one to two centuries.’

I am mourning the loss of the apples. Even more so, I grieve the attitude from the general population. Most of my fellow Americans are perfectly happy with two, three at the most, varieties of apples. The red one, the green one, and the yellow one. Preferably well calibrated and shiny, to emulate the newness of industrial objects, straight out of an assembly line. Show them a real apple, and they will not touch it. The newer generations have been conditioned to eat with their eyes, according to an artificial aesthetic, that has nothing to do with the goodness of nature.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #14

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
showers at pool 2
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:
run full dishwasher

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on half day
mom:
communal:
lights
run full dishwasher

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmons
tea
organic milk
dinner restaurant salad, fish, seafood, coffee, wine
mom:
take out sushi and chicken salad from Whole Foods
organic apples
communal:

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
2 milk cartons
plastic bottle sparkling water

Transportation

personal:
drive to pool 6 miles
mom:
communal:
drive to restaurant 5 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

Read Full Post »

Day 13 of Daily Footprint Project. I am amazed at the change. The desire to shop has totally left me.

Nurturing In a Consumerist Culture

What has not stopped, is the need to nurture my children. My daughter is sixteen. And I still want to indulge her with sweetness, once in a while. She resists, she pushes me away, she is an independent soul who wants to fly away from the nest. ‘I’ve got a life’ is one of her favorite phrases . Other than making food for her, one of the few concrete ways, that I can still give to her, is to go shopping with her.

Today, was the Green Festival in San Francisco. May she come with me, and bring some of her friends along, to go look for a party dress, she wondered? Four girls and I all got into the Prius, and off we were. I, to my green event, they, to the downtown mall. She called to ask me, should she get the $140 dress or the $240 one. The most expensive one was the right color, but then she wondered, that was a lot of money. I met her and her friends, back at the mall. Happy, with their hands full of shopping bags. I was happy too. Four teenage girls, giggling away, marveling at their purchases, and entertaining me with their small talk on the way back in the car. It had been a while, since I had enjoyed such lightness.

Of course, I ask myself the question, could I find other ways to share moments with my daughter? and to give to her? I can hear the voices of some of my 100% green friends. You should . . . , you should . . . , each one with a different idea, a different version of how they were able to pull it off with their own children. Sweet moments with their sixteen year old that did not blemish their green conscience. I know, and I wish I could do the same. Right now, it is not so easy.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #13

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
shower 1
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on half day
mom:
communal:
lights
cook crepes on stove

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmons
tea
organic milk
falafel wrap at Green Festival
water in recyclable plastic cup
dinner out at friends’ house
mom:
crepes
gave money to the kids to get their own dinner
communal:

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom:
two shopping bags from expedition
paper magazines and flyers from Green Festival
communal:
2 papers

Transportation

personal:
mom:
communal:
drive to San Francisco 72 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
two dresses, made in?
communal:
flowers from Whole Foods for dinner host

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Day 12 of Daily Footprint Project. It’s been in the back of my mind, these last few days.

Rationalization in the Not So Green Mind

I noticed I started not unplugging my computer at night. Not a big deal, I told myself. Such a small thing. Even the outlet looks so small. How much harm can be done? I am allowed to slip once in a while. Plus I have been so busy. I want to make sure my laptop is all fired up, ready to go, as soon as I get up. Can’t stand the inconvenience of plugging it again, and waiting for the screen to come up. The thought came up every night. I should not be doing this. Each time, quickly dismissed. Such a small thing. So that I could pretend, and go on with an almost clean conscience.

Go Ahead, Rationalize. Monkeys Do It, Too., an article in this week’s New York Times Science Section, reports interesting findings from an experiment by three Yale researchers. What they found, is that the way we deal with cognitive dissonance – the clashing of conflicting thoughts -, is a very primitive process. Monkeys do it, and so do four year olds. They eliminate the disturbing thought, and rationalize the chosen one. Not much conscious thought goes into the process. This is an adaptive behavior, that allows us to move on.

There is a lot of rationalization going on in the not so green mind. And as the Yale research shows, this is a behavior deeply rooted in evolutionary utility. The fact that it is largely unconscious makes it even more potent. One way to depotentiate that behavior, is to make it conscious, by bringing it out into the open.

And of course, I need to mention the power strip solution. I had several strips lying in the basement. The least I can do was hook one up. Done!

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #12

Water

personal:
flush toilet 2
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
two showers at the gym
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:
run full dishwasher
rinse salad, veggies

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on half day
laptop plugged in overnight
desk lamp plugged in overnight
mom:
heat chocolate milk
communal:
toaster for guests’ toasts 3’
lights
run full dishwasher
cook crepes on stove

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmons
tea
organic milk
mom:
pastry from Whole Foods
organic hot chocolate
communal:
toasts for guest
tea for guests
organic raspberries for guests
organic chicken
organic salad
takeout pizza
crepes

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers
raspberries plastic container
chicken bones
vegetable peels

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
pizza carton box

Transportation

personal:
drive to gym 6 miles
mom:
communal:
drive to grocery store 4 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

Read Full Post »

Day 11 of Daily Footprint Project. The main thrust of the project has been to examine my personal contribution in terms of ecological footprint. Seems simple enough.

Is it really? That’s when the roasted chicken from Whole Foods comes in.

The Green Psychology of Families

I decided to buy the creature this morning, in anticipation of Catherine’s needs for a nutritious late afternoon snack. I know, I should not contribute further to pollution with yet another non recyclable plastic container. But I did. I was going to be busy all day. No time to cook. She was to have dinner with her Dad late, and I figured she could munch on the chicken when she got back from her school with her friends.

The chicken got me thinking.

As the nurturer in our home, I am responsible for purchasing the chicken. What happens to the chicken after that, is up to the consumers, my teenage children. How much of it gets actually eaten? How much of it goes to waste? I have little control over that part.

I am a member of the family system, and whether I want it or not, my ecological footprint gets muddled in the course of my interactions with other family members. I already alluded to the emotional component of green parenting, in regards to my need to nurture with more food than necessary – Day 1 of Daily Footprint Project -, and my difficulty setting limits, as in the laundry example – The Complicated Landscape of Green Parenting -. With Prad, issues of control, power, and authority, make it difficult for both he and I to take charge of our own green-ness, or lack thereof. When Prad insists on taking repeated far away trips, am I to stay home, or go along with him, but compromise my views on limiting air traveling. When I disagree with him on his stance on food portion control, and I generously buy and cook food as if there were a few more people in the house, how does that affect his own intentions?

All of the above highlights the importance of the ecological impact of not just each individual member in the family, but also the role of the family as a system, with a complex set of relationships, and emotions. The boundaries between I and the rest of the family are not so clear when it comes to our ecological impact, and it is simply impossible to separate my individual footprint from the whole.

Staying with a family systems framework, it is worth noting also, that as a member of the family I have the power to influence other family members through the positive environmental changes I choose to make on a personal level:

‘The connectedness and reactivity make the functioning of family members interdependent. A change in one person’s functioning is predictably followed by reciprocal changes in the functioning of others. Families differ somewhat in the degree of interdependence, but it is always present to some degree’. Quote from Bowen Center website.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #11

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
two showers at the gym
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 4’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on half day
mom:
heat chocolate milk
heat muffing
cook cream of wheat
communal:
lights

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic orange
tea
organic milk
organic chicken soup
organic bread
mom:
organic blueberry muffin
organic hot chocolate
cream of wheat with organic milk
roasted chicken
pomagranate
communal:

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
orange peel
chicken bones
mom:
uneaten baked potato
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom: paper bag for muffin
cream of wheat paper box
communal:
2 papers
roll from paper towel

Transportation

personal:
drive to gym 6 miles
drive to business presentation 5miles
mom:
communal:
drive to grocery store 4 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

Read Full Post »

Day 10 of Daily Footprint Project. I had to attend a business meeting in San Francisco late in the evening. Full of good intentions, I had planned to take the train.

Until I looked at the Caltrain schedule.

My meeting was from 6.30 to 8.30. The next train was at 10pm. I would not have gotten home until 11.15. Driving got me home at 9.15 instead. I am willing to go only so far with my green-ness. Two hours make a huge difference, especially this late at night. That’s a distance of 72 miles I could have not driven, if only the Caltrain system had been a bit more responsive to my needs.

I don’t know how many other folks go through this kind of calculated trade off. Huge invonvenience and pure green-ness, versus no hassle and a smeared green conscience. Again, economics come into play. Do the numbers warrant more late night trains? What is the cost of running more trains? Financial costs? Carbon pollution costs?

Upon further examination, I found this to be a hot issue in the Bay Area. Several advocacy organizations have been stirring the pot. The local papers have written articles on the subject. The real problem is not so much Caltrain, as the lack of a sound overall strategy for the whole Bay Area public transit. The train (Caltrain), bus (VTA), and subway (BART) authorities need to work together with local residents. This raises questions of leadership, priorities, and policy.

VTACaltrainBART

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #10

Water

personal:
flush toilet 4
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 5
two showers at the gym
mom:
communal:

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 4’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on half day
mom:
heat chocolate milk
communal:
lights

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic orange
tea
organic milk
organic chicken soup
organic bread
mom:
organic blueberry muffin
organic hot chocolate
communal:
pizza takeout
salad

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
orange peel
salad veggie peelings
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
4 pizza cardboard boxes Transportation

personal:
drive to gym 6 miles
drive to San Francisco 72 miles
mom:
communal:

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:
 

Read Full Post »

Day 9 of Daily Footprint Project, and still nothing to report in the ‘Non Food Shopping’ area. Pretty amazing, given that only a few months ago, I was still writing about my frequent fashion expeditions to Target and Anthropologie.

From Compulsive Shopper to Passionate Environmentalist

You see, I no longer have the time, nor the desire to shop. My green conscience did not even need to kick in. The urge left me, just like that. Replaced instead by a much bigger passion. The La Marguerite blog has filled up my life, leaving no room for extraneous activities.

I would like to talk about the personal vacuum. There is this space inside, that we all have, and that we need to fill up until it becomes full. Ful-fill-ment. I never realized the true meaning of the word, until now. If we are fortunate enough to find a passion, like I am with this new vocation as an environmentalist, the passion will transform our life, into a meaningful adventure, and we will experience that fullness, that is so essential to our well being.

What happens when the vacuum stays empty for too long? It feels just like that, empty. And it drives us to look outside for fillers. This has been an ongoing thread in my blog, starting with ‘The King of Buthan’, and more recently, in ‘The World Needs Some of That Gypsy Spirit‘. Al Gore, during his interview for the Nobel Peace Prize, qualified the climate crisis, as ‘a moral and spiritual challenge to all of humanity’. I would like to add, that part of the solution to that challenge, is also of a spiritual nature. By spiritual, I mean the universal human need to transcend one’s condition with extra-ordinary meaning. A love so great that it literally takes our breath away.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #9

Water

personal:
flush toilet 2
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
two showers at the gym
mom:
communal:
rinse dishes
wash veggies
water for soup

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 4’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on all day
mom:
cook cream of wheat
communal:
lights

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmon
tea
organic milk
mom:
cream of wheat with organic milk
mango tango juice from Odwalla
communal:
organic soup with leftover chicken and veggies
organic salad
wild fish

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
sheets of paper
mom:
communal:
vegetable peelings
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
milk bottle
junk mail

Transportation

personal:
drive to appointment, stopped by grocery on way back 5 miles
drive to gym 6 miles
mom:
communal:

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

 

Read Full Post »

Day 8 of Daily Footprint Project. I have covered pretty much every aspect of my daily footprint, that I can think off.

Ecological Footprint, Looking Up and Out

Except for one glitch. In business, it’s called overhead. A mixed bag, where individual responsibility gets lost. In ecological footprint terms, it includes things in my house, such as, the fridge, the water heater, the heater, all the appliances that are plugged in 24×7, and the pool filter.

Going even further, and venturing into the field of environmental economics, I also need to look at my footprint contributions, as a consumer of external benefits. Included in that category are all the ‘free’ services I enjoy from collective entities. In most cases, I am paying for the services indirectly, e.g., city tax for public infrastructures such as street lighting, or merchant markup that covers store overhead costs such as heating. It is also clear, that I need to claim my share of the ecological footprint from such activities.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #8
 Water

personal:
flush toilet 2
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
two showers at the gym
mom:
rinse grapes
communal:
rinse dishes
wash salad

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 4’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on all day
mom:
cook cream of wheat
cook bacon
communal:
lights
oven 325, 1hr 30’

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmon
prosciutto from Italy
tea
organic milk
mom:
bacon from Canada
cream of wheat with organic milk
communal:
baked organic chicken
baked organic potatoes
organic salad

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
sheets of paper 3
mom:
paper towel to wipe off fat from bacon
#5 plastic container from takeout chicken
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers
plastic wrap for chicken
1 plastic bag

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers

Transportation

personal:
drive to appointment 5 miles
drive to gym 6 miles
drive to business meeting 5 miles
mom:
communal:

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

Read Full Post »

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