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Posts Tagged ‘human behavior’

Day 28 of Daily Footprint Project. Cold, and rainy. I had to go out twice, once to a doctor’s appointment, and then to the pool. Both outings in the five miles range, a perfect ‘bike it’ distance. ‘Pervenche‘ was waiting, and I had made such a big deal of looking for the perfect bike and finding it, and being ready to ditch my car, that I felt obligated to come through.

What happened next is less glorious. I was busy blogging, making comments on the Huffington Post. Lots of posts on global warming today, and I had to make my opinion heard. Came 12. 30, the time when I could still have made it to the doctor on my bike, and I had to decide. To bike or to drive. The computer screen was luring me with one more post to comment on. Ten minutes more, that’s all I needed. What the heck! Forget my green conscience, forget all the promises to myself, and to my readers. The temptation of convenience, of minutes shaved away for more blogging about environmental concerns, was too great. The truth is I love my car.

This is the kind of stuff that I would push back in the recess of my mind, and my heart, if I was not committed to telling the truth, all of it. Am I embarrassed? Yes. The irony of the situation does not escape me. Today, I was a Green Hypocrite. I could dwell in self-loathing. More interesting, though, is to get down to the root of my behavior, to understand as I have tried in the past, what causes the split between my rather high awareness, and those moments when I choose to not act accordingly. This is where it is important to pay attention to thoughts, no matter how seemingly mundane, for they hold clues to the intrinsic human problem at the root of climate change. Going back to that 12.30 moment, when I had to decide, to bike or to drive, here is what I found:

Laziness. Priorities. A drop in the invisible cloud of CO2. It won’t make a difference. I am having so much fun, don’t want to be bothered. Habit. Comfort. Convenience. How bad is it anyway, to drive such short distance once or twice a day? It can’t hurt that much. Effort, I don’t want to make the effort. The weather wasn’t even that nice. My time is precious. The extra time spent biking, I can use doing other ‘more productive’, more important things, such as working on green projects. Nothing is going to happen if I drive instead of biking. No consequences. I don’t have the discipline. What’s in it for me? The car, so fast, such a proven entity. I can zip in and out of places. I know, I should bike. But it’s such a small thing. Today, I can ‘sin’, only once, maybe twice. I will get it right some other time. Ah! the immediate pleasure of blogging away, versus the higher satisfaction of a clean conscience. Big, instant pleasure over small dent in my green conscience. Pleasure wins. I can’t even see that CO2 anyway. It’s invisible. A crime without the evidence to prove it. Everybody else is driving anyway, or almost everyone. I am too wrapped up into the moment. The present supersedes any hypothetical concerns about the consequence of my small actions for the whole planet, myself included. There are two issues. The lack of immediate consequence for my action. And the dilution of personal responsibility, the big pot problem.

There is a lot to be learned from that thought soup – I stole the words from Nadine – Lots of insights, not just about myself, but more importantly, about the human condition in relationship to climate change. What are the personal obstacles to change? How can these can be best addressed? I just followed a fascinating exchange on DotEarth, between Andrew Revkin, and his readers, on that same topic yesterday. The discussion did not suffer from a lack of opinions . . . and intellectual ramblings. What is missing most in many of the climate change conversations, is that connection to the psychological reality of the individual. That reality affects individuals in their personal lifestyle choices, their professional choices as influencers, deciders, and politicians. It is probably the single most important factor, besides technology, with the potential to critically alter the course of climate change.

 

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #28

Water
personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 5
shower at pool 2
mom:
wash fruit
communal:
rinse dishes
wash vegetables
wash rice

Electricity/gas
personal:
electric toothbrush 4’
microwave tea 2’
microwave milk 2’
laptop on all  day
microwave oatmeal 4’
mom:
communal:
lights
bake chicken in oven 30’
stir fry zucchinis 4’
microwave rice 30’

Food
personal:
tea
organic milk
organic persimmons 2
organic chocolate
oatmeal
mom:
grapes
breakfast pastries from Whole Foods
communal:
baked organic chicken
organic brown rice
organic zucchinis
organic salad

Waste
personal:
toilet paper
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers
chicken packaging
zucchini package
salad plastic 

Recycling
personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers

Transportation
personal:
drive to appointment (stop by Trader Joe’s on way back) 5 miles
drive to pool 6 miles
mom:
communal:

Non food shopping
personal:
mom:
communal:

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Day 19 of Daily Footprint Project. The paper recycling basket keeps filling up.

All That Paper’s Got to Go

The newspapers, I take responsibility for. Reading the papers in the morning gives me great pleasure, and I am not ready to let that indulgence go. At least, not yet. What troubles me is all the junk mail. Several times, I have discussed with Prad, my intention of registering with Green Dimes. Prad thinks the city already has a similar program, and why pay the $15 to Green Dimes? Well, I went on the city’s website and they do not have such a thing. Still, Prad thinks I have not gone far enough in my investigation. I should be calling and talk to a live body.

The result is, my resolve has waned, and I have given up on the whole junk mail bit. This morning, though, the basket came back into my field of consciousness. Flouting me with its pile of useless junk mail, that serves no purpose at all other than being a source of disagreement between me and husband. Shall I dare Prad and go ahead, pay the $15 to Green Dimes?

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #19

Water

personal:
flush toilet 2
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 5
shower 1
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:
wash vegetables

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
microwave milk 2’
laptop on half day
mom:
communal:
lights
stir fry zucchinis
stir fry fish

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic oranges
tea
organic milk
organic chocolate
organic raspberries
mom:
Starbucks fruit and cheese platter for Little Sister
Whole Foods takeout mashed potatoes for Little Sister
lunch out at restaurant with Little Sister
communal:
fried organic zucchinis
fried wild fish with mushrooms

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
raspberries plastic box
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom:
gave old clothes to Little Sister’s family
communal:
2 papers
junk mail

Transportation

personal:
mom:
communal:
drive Little Sister to Turkey Trot 12 miles (stop at Starbucks on the way)
drive to restaurant 4 miles (stop at Whole Foods on the way)

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

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Day 18 of Daily Footprint Project. It’s been sitting by the fireplace. Daring me with its unopened carton. Must have been a week already.

All the Reasons Why We Still Have Not Installed the Composter

Our new Feelgood composter. Prad ordered it. ‘Now you put it together.’ Of course, I have got a good excuse. I had gum surgery on Monday, and I have been feeling lousy. The few days before that, I was too busy, and the composter did not even make it once on my daily to do list. Plus, shouldn’t Prad take care of it anyway? I thought he would be the one in charge, in the composting department. He usually likes that kind of stuff. I know what he is thinking. ‘It’s about time you walk your talk. I have done enough as it is. Let’s see if you come through here.’ I am being tested on the authenticity of my declared green-ness.

The truth is, I love blogging about green psychology and green living. It comes easy to me. And I am seduced by the idea of composting, of returning what comes from the earth, back to the earth. It feels so right, poetic almost. Taking the box outside, unpacking the composter, assembling it, now, that’s another story. I can always find something better to do. Why is it so difficult for me to translate my intention into action?

I am happy with my life the way it is right now. The prospect of the satisfaction from composting does not outweigh the inconvenience of having to put it together. If someone else did it for me, I would use it, as long as it does not require too much extra effort. I think of all the greenies who are going to read this, and I anticipate their judgment. If it was not for the blog, I would definitely keep all this business to myself. I feel ashamed. No, I need to remember, the main thing is to be honest.

Let me take on my marketing hat for a second. What I am voicing is a very real pain. I want to be green, but I need some help. Will someone, please, make green easy on me? Set things up for me, hold my hand as I undertake the heroic task of greening my life.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #18

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
shower 1
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:
run full load dishwasher

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
microwave milk 2’
laptop on all day
mom:
heat cream of wheat
microwave half potato
broil steak
fry bokchoy
communal:
lights

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic oranges
tea
organic milk
organic chocolate
organic raspberries
mom:
cream of wheat with organic milk
organic raspberries
organic buffalo steak
organic half potato
organic baby bokchoy
communal:
dinner out

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
raspberries plastic box
mom:
most of cream of wheat (leftover from breakfast)
paper wrapper for steak
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers
rotten sweet potato
old half potato

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
plastic milk bottle

Transportation

personal:
mom:
communal:
drive to electronics store 2 miles
drive to restaurant 4 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
phone for Little Sister’s family
communal:

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At a dinner last night, the young woman sitting next to me, a well intentioned green wannabe, told me how hard it is to keep track of all her daily actions. ‘There is so much to pay attention to. In the end, I usually give up.‘ This morning, again, I had a similar conversation with my friend Anne. She too, is convinced of the necessity of changing her lifestyle. There are two things she is already doing, that she feels good about. She drives a small car and she turns off the faucet when she brushes her teeth. Other than that, where to start? She is at a loss.

In both cases, my friends expressed a feeling of being overwhelmed by the magnitude of the changes expected of them, as implied by the green press. As if to prove their point, I just found ‘A Consumer’s Guide to Going Green‘, a very well researched article in the Wall Street Journal this week, that left me, like my two friends, in a state of ‘Wow! You mean I have to do all this.‘ Too much thrown at me at once. I read it, and saved it for reference, for the time when I will summon the courage to go green all the way. The ‘Green Living‘ folder on my desktop has already 17 such reference articles, not including all the green lists I have written for this blog. Lists are mostly good for the list maker, I realize. They give a sense of mastery, and order. The illusion that things are taken care of. I have done my job, I have told you what to do. Now whether you do it or not, becomes your problem.

Anne is a smart woman. She can handle complexity very well, in her professional life. When it comes to green, however, she wants simplicity. ‘If I were to do only one thing, what would it be?’ I was tempted to answer her question on the spot. Instead, I went home, and started thinking about her request. Part of my problem as a green communicator, is I don’t want to choose. Insulating the house, lowering the thermostat, buying energy efficient appliances, using CFLs bulbs, buying less, driving less, flying less, using less water, using the washer and dryer less, getting a low gas mileage car, skipping red meat, etc. Everything is important, isn’t it?

There are three issues. First, is identifying priorities in terms of the biggest individual contributors to greenhouse gases emissions. Second, is figuring out from that first list, what is the one thing most likely to engage the green wannabe into his or her life greening process. Third, is how to support the person in that process. I will try to address all three questions in a series of subsequent posts.

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Day 15 of Daily Footprint Project. The day for round two of gum surgery. Oh, joy! I am to eat only soft food for the next few days. Fortunately, there is Whole Foods and its well stocked deli section.

Why should I cook if I don’t have to?

The split pea soup with ham struck my fancy. I filled up the biggest size carton. Prad did the calculation. Per ounce, it is really the best deal.

As of late, I am relying more and more on Whole Foods and other outside cookeries to supplement our menus. With the children less and less home for our family dinners, cooking has lost some of its appeal. In fact, it has become a chore, that detracts from other creative activities I’ d much rather be doing. Blogging, exploring ideas for green ventures are where my heart is for now.

I may be happy away from the kitchen, but what does that do for the environment? The image of the throw away soup carton is haunting me. With each take out, I add to the landfill pile. I could go around the problem, by bringing my own containers. I have never seen anyone do it, but maybe I could start a trend. Actually, it would be kind of cool to see what people say. The more I think about it, I totally dig the idea.

Until I get a bike – number one on my green to do list – , there is also the issue of driving to get the soup. I can rationalize by thinking that I would need to drive anyway to buy the ingredients to make the soup. The answer to that one is twofold: one, get a bike, two, plan better and make less trips to the grocery store. Even more ambitious, would be to also cultivate my own vegetables. I am learning to be practical, however, and to consider only what I know myself capable of sustaining in the long run. Gardening is just not my thing. Better scrap that idea.

There is a third problem with relying on take out. Food sourcing. I give up any control on the types of ingredients that are being used. Same when I eat out at a restaurant. In both cases, I am abdicating my responsibility as a responsible consumer, leaving it to others to decide what goes into my food. Once you start, this kind of logic can be crazy making, and realistically, I am not going to give up eating out. Still, there is some truth in the thought, and maybe reason for a compromise. Like air traveling, the idea is not to give up such indulgences altogether. More sensible, is to limit them to special occasions, and make them the exceptions rather than the norm.

I can think of one good argument for not cooking in my kitchen. Foodpooling, as in carpooling. I just made up the word. It is much more efficient to cook for hundreds of people at once, as is the case for Whole Foods, than to each cook our separate meals. I am not aware of any study on the topic, but I am ready to bet that the energy saved must be substantial.

To summarize, if I manage to bike to the grocery store, and bring my own containers, I will come out pretty clean here.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #15

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
shower 1
full load laundry
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:
run full dishwasher

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
microwave soup 4’
microwave milk 2’
laptop on half day
full load laundry washer & dryer
mom:
communal:
lights
run full dishwasher

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmons
tea
organic milk
takeout split pea soup from Whole Foods
organic apple sauce
organic chocolate
mom:
organic apples
communal:

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers
five day leftover chicken soup

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
milk carton
glass jar apple sauce

Transportation

personal:
drive to orthodontist 5 miles
mom:
communal:

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

Read Full Post »

Day 13 of Daily Footprint Project. I am amazed at the change. The desire to shop has totally left me.

Nurturing In a Consumerist Culture

What has not stopped, is the need to nurture my children. My daughter is sixteen. And I still want to indulge her with sweetness, once in a while. She resists, she pushes me away, she is an independent soul who wants to fly away from the nest. ‘I’ve got a life’ is one of her favorite phrases . Other than making food for her, one of the few concrete ways, that I can still give to her, is to go shopping with her.

Today, was the Green Festival in San Francisco. May she come with me, and bring some of her friends along, to go look for a party dress, she wondered? Four girls and I all got into the Prius, and off we were. I, to my green event, they, to the downtown mall. She called to ask me, should she get the $140 dress or the $240 one. The most expensive one was the right color, but then she wondered, that was a lot of money. I met her and her friends, back at the mall. Happy, with their hands full of shopping bags. I was happy too. Four teenage girls, giggling away, marveling at their purchases, and entertaining me with their small talk on the way back in the car. It had been a while, since I had enjoyed such lightness.

Of course, I ask myself the question, could I find other ways to share moments with my daughter? and to give to her? I can hear the voices of some of my 100% green friends. You should . . . , you should . . . , each one with a different idea, a different version of how they were able to pull it off with their own children. Sweet moments with their sixteen year old that did not blemish their green conscience. I know, and I wish I could do the same. Right now, it is not so easy.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #13

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
shower 1
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on half day
mom:
communal:
lights
cook crepes on stove

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmons
tea
organic milk
falafel wrap at Green Festival
water in recyclable plastic cup
dinner out at friends’ house
mom:
crepes
gave money to the kids to get their own dinner
communal:

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom:
two shopping bags from expedition
paper magazines and flyers from Green Festival
communal:
2 papers

Transportation

personal:
mom:
communal:
drive to San Francisco 72 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
two dresses, made in?
communal:
flowers from Whole Foods for dinner host

Read Full Post »

Day 12 of Daily Footprint Project. It’s been in the back of my mind, these last few days.

Rationalization in the Not So Green Mind

I noticed I started not unplugging my computer at night. Not a big deal, I told myself. Such a small thing. Even the outlet looks so small. How much harm can be done? I am allowed to slip once in a while. Plus I have been so busy. I want to make sure my laptop is all fired up, ready to go, as soon as I get up. Can’t stand the inconvenience of plugging it again, and waiting for the screen to come up. The thought came up every night. I should not be doing this. Each time, quickly dismissed. Such a small thing. So that I could pretend, and go on with an almost clean conscience.

Go Ahead, Rationalize. Monkeys Do It, Too., an article in this week’s New York Times Science Section, reports interesting findings from an experiment by three Yale researchers. What they found, is that the way we deal with cognitive dissonance – the clashing of conflicting thoughts -, is a very primitive process. Monkeys do it, and so do four year olds. They eliminate the disturbing thought, and rationalize the chosen one. Not much conscious thought goes into the process. This is an adaptive behavior, that allows us to move on.

There is a lot of rationalization going on in the not so green mind. And as the Yale research shows, this is a behavior deeply rooted in evolutionary utility. The fact that it is largely unconscious makes it even more potent. One way to depotentiate that behavior, is to make it conscious, by bringing it out into the open.

And of course, I need to mention the power strip solution. I had several strips lying in the basement. The least I can do was hook one up. Done!

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #12

Water

personal:
flush toilet 2
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
two showers at the gym
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:
run full dishwasher
rinse salad, veggies

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 2’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on half day
laptop plugged in overnight
desk lamp plugged in overnight
mom:
heat chocolate milk
communal:
toaster for guests’ toasts 3’
lights
run full dishwasher
cook crepes on stove

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmons
tea
organic milk
mom:
pastry from Whole Foods
organic hot chocolate
communal:
toasts for guest
tea for guests
organic raspberries for guests
organic chicken
organic salad
takeout pizza
crepes

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
mom:
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers
raspberries plastic container
chicken bones
vegetable peels

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
pizza carton box

Transportation

personal:
drive to gym 6 miles
mom:
communal:
drive to grocery store 4 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

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Day 11 of Daily Footprint Project. The main thrust of the project has been to examine my personal contribution in terms of ecological footprint. Seems simple enough.

Is it really? That’s when the roasted chicken from Whole Foods comes in.

The Green Psychology of Families

I decided to buy the creature this morning, in anticipation of Catherine’s needs for a nutritious late afternoon snack. I know, I should not contribute further to pollution with yet another non recyclable plastic container. But I did. I was going to be busy all day. No time to cook. She was to have dinner with her Dad late, and I figured she could munch on the chicken when she got back from her school with her friends.

The chicken got me thinking.

As the nurturer in our home, I am responsible for purchasing the chicken. What happens to the chicken after that, is up to the consumers, my teenage children. How much of it gets actually eaten? How much of it goes to waste? I have little control over that part.

I am a member of the family system, and whether I want it or not, my ecological footprint gets muddled in the course of my interactions with other family members. I already alluded to the emotional component of green parenting, in regards to my need to nurture with more food than necessary – Day 1 of Daily Footprint Project -, and my difficulty setting limits, as in the laundry example – The Complicated Landscape of Green Parenting -. With Prad, issues of control, power, and authority, make it difficult for both he and I to take charge of our own green-ness, or lack thereof. When Prad insists on taking repeated far away trips, am I to stay home, or go along with him, but compromise my views on limiting air traveling. When I disagree with him on his stance on food portion control, and I generously buy and cook food as if there were a few more people in the house, how does that affect his own intentions?

All of the above highlights the importance of the ecological impact of not just each individual member in the family, but also the role of the family as a system, with a complex set of relationships, and emotions. The boundaries between I and the rest of the family are not so clear when it comes to our ecological impact, and it is simply impossible to separate my individual footprint from the whole.

Staying with a family systems framework, it is worth noting also, that as a member of the family I have the power to influence other family members through the positive environmental changes I choose to make on a personal level:

‘The connectedness and reactivity make the functioning of family members interdependent. A change in one person’s functioning is predictably followed by reciprocal changes in the functioning of others. Families differ somewhat in the degree of interdependence, but it is always present to some degree’. Quote from Bowen Center website.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #11

Water

personal:
flush toilet 3
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
two showers at the gym
mom:
rinse dishes
communal:

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 4’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on half day
mom:
heat chocolate milk
heat muffing
cook cream of wheat
communal:
lights

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic orange
tea
organic milk
organic chicken soup
organic bread
mom:
organic blueberry muffin
organic hot chocolate
cream of wheat with organic milk
roasted chicken
pomagranate
communal:

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
orange peel
chicken bones
mom:
uneaten baked potato
communal:
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom: paper bag for muffin
cream of wheat paper box
communal:
2 papers
roll from paper towel

Transportation

personal:
drive to gym 6 miles
drive to business presentation 5miles
mom:
communal:
drive to grocery store 4 miles

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

Read Full Post »

Back from E2 meeting. E2 is a wonderful environmental organization for environmental entrepreneurs, that works a lot on policy issues. David Gohigian, Assistant secretary, U.S. Department of Commerce was the guest speaker, along with Bop Epstein, co-founder of E2. At the end, someone in the audience raised the question of:

A lot of attention is being paid on policies, businesses, and technology, but what is being done to change consumer behaviors?

One of the answers was: to shift behavior at the point of purchase, through price incentives. Other solution mentioned: to deliver convincing information such as percentile data for household energy consumption.

Here is the irony. Most of us – myself included – drove to the meeting. We drank bottled water, in plastic cups. #1 recyclable plastic, but plastic still. Lunch was served in disposable paper plates.

My point is, the hurdles to changing consumer behaviors are HUGE. And price incentives are only a very small part of the answer.

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Day 9 of Daily Footprint Project, and still nothing to report in the ‘Non Food Shopping’ area. Pretty amazing, given that only a few months ago, I was still writing about my frequent fashion expeditions to Target and Anthropologie.

From Compulsive Shopper to Passionate Environmentalist

You see, I no longer have the time, nor the desire to shop. My green conscience did not even need to kick in. The urge left me, just like that. Replaced instead by a much bigger passion. The La Marguerite blog has filled up my life, leaving no room for extraneous activities.

I would like to talk about the personal vacuum. There is this space inside, that we all have, and that we need to fill up until it becomes full. Ful-fill-ment. I never realized the true meaning of the word, until now. If we are fortunate enough to find a passion, like I am with this new vocation as an environmentalist, the passion will transform our life, into a meaningful adventure, and we will experience that fullness, that is so essential to our well being.

What happens when the vacuum stays empty for too long? It feels just like that, empty. And it drives us to look outside for fillers. This has been an ongoing thread in my blog, starting with ‘The King of Buthan’, and more recently, in ‘The World Needs Some of That Gypsy Spirit‘. Al Gore, during his interview for the Nobel Peace Prize, qualified the climate crisis, as ‘a moral and spiritual challenge to all of humanity’. I would like to add, that part of the solution to that challenge, is also of a spiritual nature. By spiritual, I mean the universal human need to transcend one’s condition with extra-ordinary meaning. A love so great that it literally takes our breath away.

Daily Footprint Project
Daily Log
Day #9

Water

personal:
flush toilet 2
wash face 2
brush teeth 2
wash hands 4
two showers at the gym
mom:
communal:
rinse dishes
wash veggies
water for soup

Electricity/gas

personal:
electric toothbrush 2
microwave tea 4’
microwave oatmeal 4’
laptop on all day
mom:
cook cream of wheat
communal:
lights

Food

personal:
oatmeal with organic milk
organic persimmon
tea
organic milk
mom:
cream of wheat with organic milk
mango tango juice from Odwalla
communal:
organic soup with leftover chicken and veggies
organic salad
wild fish

Waste

personal:
toilet paper
sheets of paper
mom:
communal:
vegetable peelings
3 newspaper plastic wrappers

Recycling

personal:
mom:
communal:
2 papers
milk bottle
junk mail

Transportation

personal:
drive to appointment, stopped by grocery on way back 5 miles
drive to gym 6 miles
mom:
communal:

Non food shopping

personal:
mom:
communal:

 

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