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Archive for January, 2009

During our Dreamfish Lab meeting last week, Peter (Kaminski) suggested several cool titles for me and Paul (Loper) to read about complementary economy. Fascinating subject. I want to learn all there is to know about these very old, and also very new ways to capture transactions. There is only one problem. Books scare me now. They really do.

Ever since I discovered blogs, and Facebook, and Twitter, I have slowly, but surely moved away from books. My excuse: I have no time. There is always a new post to write, or read, or comment on, and stuff to tweet about. And when I need an answer, I go on Twitter or Linkedin, or to the  Google Search box. 

The thought of reading a book fills me with angst. I am not sure I am up to the task, anymore. The last time, was Obama‘s Dreams From my Father. But that was easy reading. My mind has become accustomed to quick scanning, quite a different gymnastic from sustained attention. 

I did a bit of research on “Internet culture”, “reading”, brain”, on Google . . . And came up with links to several blog articles. I am not alone apparently. The Internet generation is at risk of turning stupid, according to some researchers. Maryanne Wolf, from Tufts University,  devotes a whole chapter on the topic, in her book, Proust and the Squid: the Story and the Science of the Reading Brain.  Of course, I did not read the book. Instead, I read an article about the book, to get the main idea. 

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Tonight, after a long day working and dealing with several mini-family crisis, I still found the time to visit Twitter, and to read, and write a few tweets. That’s pretty remarkable, when you think of it. I mean, for Twitter. No other networks, no other site’s got that kind of hold on me.

It did not take me long to figure out 10 reasons why I can’t stay away from the little birdie:

  1. it’s simple
  2. it doesn’t ask much
  3. it gives back lots
  4. it’s always there for help
  5. it’s gloriously imperfect
  6. it’s a mirror of all of humanity
  7. it’s got all the answers – almost! –
  8. it’s poetic
  9. it lets me in on the latest news
  10. it’s alive

Now, I am going to tweet about this post . . .

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Once upon a time, I met Tiffany Von Emmel on Twitter. A few tweets and meetings later, I am playing with her and the rest of the  Dreamfish team. Tiff’s got a great blog about women, and coworking, and social innovation, and the future of work. I like what she had to say today:

Women are talking… Tara Hunt wrote a blog post about the future of work involving this pattern of bridge-crossing domains. I heartfully agree. The future of work is all about transforming the box into networks.

For most of my professional life, I have struggled with THE BOX. I am sure many of you, men and women, can relate:

– Long hours spent in soul-less offices – Apologizing for my endless curiosity – Trying hard to be ‘professional’ – Wearing a suit – Juggling being a parent and working – Pleasing the bosses, and acting like one – Clocking it – Ignoring my body’s plea for a mid-day gym break – Working on meaningless, ‘important’ projects – Worrying about results first, people second – Feeling boxed in – Dreaming of a different life – 

Even more oppressing than the outside box, was the box inside, that part of me inherited from an old men’s world, that shrunk my feminine self:

Bye Bye Box
Bye Bye Box

Recently the box has given way to a more supple container, one that conforms to all of myself, and let me BE, at work, at home, out in the world. Fittingly, I changed my Linkedin profile to make room for my new liberation, proudly opening with a ‘Don’t try to squeeze me into a box. I won’t fit.’

Others are taking notice, and starting to react accordingly. Being themselves, and playing with me. I can’t tell you how good it feels. 

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I understand, Facebook’s got a big policing job to do, and it’s hard to tell one naked breast from the other. Still, that should be no excuse for insulting millions of women. For those of you who may have missed it, Facebook  removed  thousands of pictures like this one from its site:

 

Kelli Roman's Facebook Breastfeeding Picture
Kelli Roman’s Facebook Breastfeeding Picture

Facebook is citing its policy against “obscene, pornographic or sexually explicit images”. 

Latest news is, Facebook won’t budge on breastfeeding photos . . . Way to go, Facebook. Now you have successfully pissed off half of your users. 

Please join me and 123,868 other Facebook members on the Hey, Facebook, breastfeeding is not obscene (Official petition to Facebook) page.

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Online social capital is becoming a highly sought out asset, particularly for those seeking to market themselves and/or their services using social media. Based on my limited experience on the receiver’s end, here is a list of do’s and don’ts of social media:

10 Do’s of Social Media:

  1. Do comment on others’ blogs
  2. Do respond to comments on your own posts
  3. Do reciprocate comments with comments on commenter’s blog
  4. Do link generously to others’ posts
  5. Do answer emails/DM from your readers – I don’t care how important or how busy you are
  6. Do share parts about yourself that resonate with others
  7. Do make others feel better about themselves after they read you
  8. Do gift others with valuable information, offers of support, spontaneous acts of random kindness
  9. Do facilitate relevant connections amongst your readers
  10. Do answer others’ requests for help – signing of petitions, joining of causes, small donations

10 Don’ts of  Social Media:

  1. Not responding to comments on your posts
  2. Not responding to others’ online communications to you 
  3. Engaging in excessive self-promotion
  4. Making others feel bad, or even worse non existent
  5. Boasting about your 5,000 friends – frankly, I don’t give a dam
  6. Being a fake
  7. Pushing a product or a service
  8. Using others, for your personal gain only
  9. Sending automatically generated messages – this is supposed to be social
  10. Harassing others with too many asks 

Easier said than done. Particularly when dealing with multiple channels and significant numbers of ‘friends’. I have found the time required to be a good ‘friend’ an ongoing challenge. Consistent with HP’s Twitter Research quoted in Jeremiah Wang‘s blog, my coping strategy on Twitter, has been to relate with ‘friends’, in concentric circles, starting with a core of people I have an ongoing relationship with, then going into circles of decreasing interaction frequency.  In the blogging department, I have had phases of intense dedication, when I followed my own medicine to the letter, followed by periods of neglect, as happened recently before I relaunched this blog. 

I wonder, what else would you add to those two lists, either from a user or a producer’s perspective?

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