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Posts Tagged ‘water shortage’

It’s that time of the month again, and I am due for the Green Moms Blogging Carnival, this time over at Best of Mother Earth. I am supposed to write about gratitude, specifically three green things I am thankful for.

We behave with nature, the same way we might with a faithful lover, when we are forgetting how much we are being given, and how much our lives depends on such constant love. That’s the irony, we take nature for granted, because it’s so good to us, most of the time.

Take a few minutes and . . .

imagine a world without trees, and birds chirping in the trees, imagine the silence, and the scorching sun, and the absence of shade and coolness,

imagine a world without water, as in here:

imagine the air so polluted that you could no longer breathe freely, and would have to wear a mask 24/7, or stay indoors,

imagine . . .

While we may never know such extremes in our lifetime, we may get dangerously close, sooner than we think, if we don’t all change our ways.

Today, I am thankful for the trees, and the water, and the air.

How about you? What do you appreciate the most in nature?

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I know, I know, the economy and partisan politics have taken over our conversations, leaving little room for anything else, let alone problems that are still removed from the reality of our lives. Huge global issues such as the water crisis. A chance business meeting with a friend, about to launch a new water efficiency venture, got me thinking about water. Just as with deforestation, and biodiversity loss, I am shocked by the magnitude of the problem, and the corresponding relative inaction to curb it.

The water crisis raises some critical questions about water economics, water ethics, water technology, water efficiency, water conservation, water waste, water inequities, water rights, water laws, water politics, water awareness . . . all of which need to be addressed at the various appropriate levels.

As with other global environmental issues, it is easy to feel lost as an individual citizen.  Yet, there is lots one can do to favorably impact the situation:

  • boycott bottled water
  • conserve water at home, and other places
  • blog about it, and also comment on other blogs
  • support watchdog organizations such as Food and Water Watch
  • support legislation to encourage water conservation and efficiency
  • share problem and possible solutions with friends

You may also want to go see “Flow”,  Irena Salina’s recently released documentary on water,

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Chaos is scary. When faced with uncertainty and doom, our first reaction is to want to control. Imagine for a second, that we are still masters of the universe. And can, will whip our climate and other natural phenomena, into shape. Dammit!

Maybe now is the time, to stop deluding ourselves. Like the addicts that we are, shouldn’t we admit, finally, to our powerlessness. And embrace the reality that is being thrown at us. Oil, more and more elusive and out of our range. Food, no longer so abundant. Water, soon to become like gold. Bees refusing to pollinate.  Angry mobs rising all over, because life is not fair.

I imagine a future when we will be in charge of our destiny, again. Until then, let us surrender, and let go of our addiction.

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Last night, dinner at my house with some Silicon Valley brains. The discussion turned to global warming. I ventured that we needed some leadership and smart policies to force people and corporations into carbon neutral lives. Policies as in carbon taxes and financial incentives for sustainable choices.

I was met with protest: ‘You’ve got to let the market regulate things. It’s the most efficient, most intelligent mechanism. Otherwise you are going to be second guessing, and make matters even worse. Look at the ethanol disaster!’

To which I respond, along with Robert Kennedy Jr., which market? I don’t mind free market capitalism per se, as long as the economic parameters are set correctly. Right now, polluters are polluting the planet, without having to suffer the costs. We are polluting the air with our cars with no direct negative consequences. And as discussed in the Financial Times, water is treated as a free commodity, despite near term world shortages. These are examples of some very serious flaws that need to be fixed.

It’s common sense, folks.

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